Category: General

  • Posted By:

    Kelly Parcell

  • Category:

    General

Lead Developer of HPV Vaccines Comes Clean and Warns Parents, Young Girls that It Is All A Deadly Scam (http://www.thedailysheeple.com/lead-developer-of-hpv-vaccines-comes-clean-warns-parents-young-girls-its-all-a-giant-deadly-scam_012014). I have a patient right now who was part of the Gardasil Vaccine trials and her story is devastating. You may look at the source of this article and see that it is a controversial nay-sayer journal, however, it does correlate to the stories I have heard from my patient. I went on to comb through the literature on sites that are reputable research sites only to find validation for my skepticism all of these years. Just on PubMed alone, I found over 30 studies on the issues and concerns of the Gardasil vaccine. Those that reported positive findings had very limited parameters of success. Many, many others listed similar side effects and concerns as Dr Harper's report. Here is a report from 2013 that you may find interesting: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016780 Unfortunatly, as parents and patients, the days of trusting your provider and mainstream medicine advice are over. The infiltration and influence of the pharmaceutical industry on patient care is completely out of control! It also happens in the supplement industry and as providers, we are constantly questioning the quality and efficacy...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    General

7 Reasons Why You Should Do a Level One Workup in Addition to a Heart Scan By Steve Parcell, ND Level One Diagnostics is a cardiovascular lab that is making prevention of stroke and heart attack more of a reality.  A heart scan is very helpful in determining calcified plaque volume in the coronary arteries and by tracking the calcium laden lesions we can assess how well a treatment program is working. There are quite a bit of functional attributes a heart scan does not evaluate, however. Lets talk about a few: 1. Circulation including peripheral blood vessel tone and elasticity. 2. Endothelial function (dysfunction). When the cells that line the artery do not function well we call the endothelial dysfunction. This is the true first cause of atherosclerosis and the reason plaque starts to accumulate. 3. Arterial stiffness and arterial age. You are only as old as your arteries. 4. Stress effect on cardiovascular system. The balance between the parasympathetic and sympathetic aspects of the nervous system affect the heart and vessels in many ways. 5. Heart rate variability as determined by RR intervals. A little variability is good. You don’t want a metronome for a heart. 6. Plaque...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    General

By Steve Parcell, ND Boulder In 2013 the big chelation study was finally published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The study added further data supporting chelation for heart disease, especially coronary artery disease. Chelation therapy with disodium EDTA has been used for more than 50 years to treat atherosclerosis without proof of efficacy.The objective was to determine if an EDTA-based chelation regimen reduces cardiovascular events. Effect of disodium EDTA chelation regimen on cardiovascular events in patients with previous myocardial infarction: the TACT randomized trial. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial randomized trial enrolling 1708 patients aged 50 years or older who had experienced a myocardial infarction (MI) at least 6 weeks prior and had serum creatinine levels of 2.0 mg/dL or less. Participants were recruited at 134 US and Canadian sites. Enrollment began in September 2003 and follow-up took place until October 2011 (median, 55 months). Two hundred eighty-nine patients (17% of total; n=115 in the EDTA group and n=174 in the placebo group) withdrew consent during the trial. Patients were randomized to receive 40 infusions of a 500-mL chelation solution (3 g of disodium EDTA, 7 g of ascorbate, B vitamins, electrolytes, procaine, and heparin) (n=839) vs...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    General

By Steve Parcell, ND Valsartan is a common blood pressure lowering agent that I like for it beneficail effect aging. Now there is new data on Valsartan and plaque reversal. In the  EFFERVESCENT trial researchers hypothesized that the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan (Diovan, Novartis) would reduce carotid artery wall thickness and inhibit atherosclerotic plaque progression. The EFFERVESCENT trial included 120 participants with carotid intima-media thickness >0.65 mm who were randomly assigned valsartan 320 mg/day titrated (n=80) or placebo (n=40). Each participant underwent carotid MRI at baseline, 12 months and 24 months. At 24 months, 49 participants from the valsartan group and 27 from the placebo group could be analyzed. At 24 months, the valsartan group exhibited a decrease in mean carotid bulb vessel wall area (P=.008), whereas it was unchanged in the placebo group (P=.28); the valsartan group had a significantly greater change than the placebo group (P=.01). Similarly, mean circumferential wall thickness of the carotid bulb was decreased in the valsartan group at 24 months (P=.0035) vs. an insignificant change in the placebo group (P=.34); the valsartan group had a significantly greater change than the placebo group (P=.011). Maximum wall thickness of the carotid bulb increased with placebo at...

  • Posted By:

    Kelly Parcell

  • Category:

    General

By Kelly Parcell, ND According to the CDC up to one quarter of the population is deficient in vitamin D. Many people are on the low end of normal as well. Vitamin D is perhaps the single most underrated nutrient in the world. Even in Boulder many patients are low! The reason has a lot to do with sunscreen in the Summer and layes of clothing in the Winter. As we move into Winter in Colorado, it's a good time to have your vitamin D level checked by a simple blood test. A normal 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood test will register above 30 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL). Previously it was thought that levels 21 and below needed treatment, though more recently anything below 35 is addressed by many forward thinking practitioners. Using these levels, it is estimated that one billion people are deficient in vitamin D. Optimal levels are thought to be between 50-80 ng/ml. Recent studies reported in the New England Journal of Medicine and by the Vitamin D Council, are indicating a link to depression. Canadian researchers reviewed 14 studies, consisting of 31,424 participants and found a strong correlation between depression and a lack of Vitamin D. The lower...