Category: Clinical Nutrition

  • Posted By:

    Denise ClarkDenise Clark

  • Category:

    Clinical Nutrition

Eosinphilic esophagitis (EoE) has historically been known as a rare allergic condition. However, it is becoming increasingly more common and can occur at any age, from infants to adults. It can manifest with mild symptoms such as occasional difficulty swallowing, throat pain, vomiting, and more serious incidents of food impaction in the esophagus. In this post we'll discuss the symptoms of EoE, how it's diagnosed, and the effectiveness of different treatment options including natural options. What is Eosinphilic Esophagitis? Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic allergy condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal reflux, nausea, stomach pain, and sometimes vomiting. It is diagnosed when an excessive amount of eosinophils are found in esophageal tissue. In recent years, EoE has emerged as a common cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract problems in both children and adults. What are Eosinophils? Eosinophils are white blood cells that are made in the bone marrow and circulate through blood vessels for 8-12 hours. After circulating, eosinophils migrate into a tissue, where they remain for 1-2 weeks. The Role of Eosinophils Eosinophil contain around 200 large granules of enzymes and proteins, which break open and release their toxic contents when the eosinophil is activated. Their function is to...

  • Posted By:

    Steve ParcellSteve Parcell

  • Category:

    Athletic Performance

Gain the Skiers Edge by Eating Right in the Mountains The aim of this article is to discuss how physical activities at high altitude can potentially affect nutritional requirements. Medium altitude is defined as (1500-2500m) at this altitude oxygen saturation remains above 90% but altitude illness is possible. At high altitude (2500-5300m) oxygen saturation falls below 90%, altitude illness is common and acclimatization is necessary. As a point of reference oxygen saturation in Boulder, Colorado (5400 ft) is approximately 94%. Alpine skiing in the North American and Canadian Rockies commonly occurs at or above 3000 meters (9842 ft). Skiers who live in ski country are subject to decreased performance but those that fly in from sea level suffer even more. Maintain Hydration: It is easy to become dehydrated in high-altitude environments. Dehydration increases the risk of frost bite and worsens the fatigue, impaired judgment and apathy of hypoxia. The body's requirement for fluids is very high at altitude; often exceeding 4 liters of water per day. Altitude increases water losses from the lungs due to the cold, dry air. There is also increased urinary loss of water because altitude and cold have diuretic affect. Sweating adds to the water loss....