Category: Preventive Cardio

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

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    Preventive Cardio

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White coat hypertension may more than double your risk of a heart attack. About 1 in 5 American adults have white coat hypertension (high blood pressure in the doctor’s office but not at home) In a recent review researchers analyzed  27 studies involving more than 64,000 patients in the United States, Europe and Asia. Findings revealed that compared with people with normal blood pressure readings (both at home and at the doctor’s office), patients with white coat hypertension were at elevated risk for heart attack and death. White Coat Hypertension Might be Happening Outside the Doctor's Office The data showed that those patients with untreated white coat hypertension had a 36% increased risk of getting heart disease, 33% increased risk of death due to any cause and 109% increased risk of death from heart disease. This study did not find a strong association with stroke but other studies did. I think it can increase risk. This finding was most significant for people 55 years or older. White coat is caused by anxiety. With anxiety excitatory neurotransmitters such as epinephrine and nor-epinephrine increase. These are short acting stress neurohormones that cause constriction of the vessels, driving pressure up. When the stressor...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Preventive Cardio

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Dr. Steve Parcell, ND Most of you know that Ginger is a medicinal herb but its uses in preventive cardiology are not well known. Ginger is a member of a plant family that includes cardamom and turmeric. Its familiar aroma is mainly due to compounds called gingerols. At least 30 gingerol-related compounds are contained in the fresh ginger root (rhizome). The proportion gingerols depends on where it is from and how it is processed. Ginger has been used as a medicine for over 5000 years to treat many ailments. India is the largest producer. Ginger was a highly sought-after commodity back in the day and was exported from India to the Roman Empire for its medicinal properties. Recently Ginger has gained interest among the scientific community for its potential to treat various aspects of cardiovascular disease, in part due to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiplatelet, hypotensive, and hypolipidemic effects.These effects have all been scientifically proven although exact doses are tricky to determine in humans. Antiplatelet therapy is an effective approach for preventing coronary heart disease because this prevents clots, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes. Ginger represents a new class of platelet-activation inhibitors without the potential side effects of...