Category: Preventive Cardio

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Preventive Cardio

Our Dr. Stephen Parcell, N.D. will be co-presenting for a webinar hosted by the Advanced Applications in Medical Practice (AAMP) on Saturday, November 20, 2021, 8:00AM PST. The webinar, entitled Advanced Cardiology for the Clinician, will provide clinicians with six hours of advanced educational learning, six AMA Cat-1 CME credits, and six pharmacy credits. Dr. Stephen Parcell will join Dr. Paul Anderson, and Dr. Kashra Pournadeali, N.D., FACN for this webinar. Details: 1-Day online CME webinar providing updates for the integrative practitioner Saturday, November 20, 2021 8:00AM – 3:00PM PST Course Description: Overview of cardiovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology How the system fails (how the heart becomes dysfunctional), understanding drugs used, and gender differences in cardiovascular disease Four specific sections including case studies, updating non-drug options in hypertension, hyperlipidemia, heart failure, dysrhythmias Interventions including diet, nutrient, lifestyle and botanical approaches What you need to know to implement everything in your office   Register for the Webinar

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Intravenous Therapy

Coronary heart disease is one of the leading causes of death among both men and women in the United States. Many cardiac patients are choosing to use chelation therapy for heart disease as a form of complementary medicine. But is it safe and effective? Claims of safety concerns caused by low calcium are no longer an issue because disodium EDTA was taken off the market. Disodium EDTA had to be infused slowly because of its effect on blood levels of calcium. We now use calcium EDTA which can be infused very quickly and is very safe. Let’s look at studies examining the effectiveness of chelation with EDTA. EDTA and Chelation Studies Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT): A clinical trial called the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) attempted to answer the question of safety and effectiveness. This clinical trial, an NIH-sponsored multicenter, double-blind safety and efficacy study, took place from 2002-2012 and was conducted in 134 sites across the United States and Canada. During TACT, 1,708 people, 50+ years old, with previous heart attacks were randomly assigned to receive 40 infusions of a chelation solution or a placebo (inactive) infusion. Research participants also received an oral vitamin and mineral...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Preventive Cardio

Dr. Stephen Parcell wrote an article for Naturopathic Doctor News & Review that dives into vascular health and aging, diet and lifestyle measures, arterial stiffening, testing and treatment. Learn about extensive diagnostic and treatment options for patients seeking advanced age management. Too often, patients seeking age-management medicine tend to be most interested in their appearance. Because of this demand, medical professionals tend to also focus on cosmetic interventions, including testosterone for big muscles, hair implants, skin peels, laser treatments, dermabrasion, hormone replacement, and endless supplements – all toward the goal of hopefully looking better. I believe more emphasis should be placed on disease prevention. Though dermatologic improvements have obvious merit, prevention of serious diseases such as heart attack, stroke, and cancer often get sidelined because they hold less sex appeal. “Anti-aging medicine” will not do us any good if we die of a stroke or heart attack next week. Real optimal aging occurs from the inside out. While it will take no convincing of a naturopathic doctor that sleep, exercise, diet, and lifestyle factors promoting healthy adaptation to stress are the underpinnings of health and age management, this concept is often underemphasized by conventional anti-aging providers. Read the Full Article in Naturopathic Doctor News & Review

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Preventive Cardio

  • Tags:

    cardiovascular health

Conventionally recognized dietary factors known to promote atherosclerosis (plaque in the arteries) and that involve animal products include saturated fat, dietary cholesterol, low fiber intake, and excess iron. Bioaccumulation of environmental toxins such as herbicides, pesticides, antibiotics and hormones are excluded in this article and another matter entirely. There is an interesting fact though; not all people who have higher cholesterol and consume animal products get heart disease, stroke and atherosclerosis. Despite similar cholesterol levels, physical activity and lifestyle, some get it and some are spared–why is this? There are many reasons we get atherosclerosis and the role of animal foods in human disease is much more complex than previously thought. The Link Between Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO) and Heart Disease In 2011, researchers discovered a substance called trimethylamine-N-oxide also known as TMAO. TMAO is a byproduct of egg, meat, fish (yes fish), and milk consumption. Researchers found that people with higher levels of TMAO may have more than twice the risk of heart attack, stroke, or other cardiovascular problems, compared with people who have normal levels. TMAO can cause damage to your kidneys, heart, liver and blood vessels through different mechanisms. TMAO causes changes in cholesterol levels, activation of inflammatory pathways...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Preventive Cardio

It’s intuitive that being out of shape increases the risk of a heart attack and exercise decreases this risk.  However I also think many of us wonder about how much is too much. I have been practicing preventive cardiology for 20 years and, being based in Boulder, CO have had the privilege of seeing a large number of elite masters age athletes in my practice.  In this blog post I would like to talk about why extreme endurance exercisers (mainly runners) can have more arterial plaque and whether or not this increases the risk of a heart attack.¹ I say mainly runners because we have the most data on them compared to cyclists, rowers or cross-country skiers. Many of us in the field of cardiology have been trying to figure out why some athletes get plaque and if this increases the risk of heart attack. Exercise is supposed to be good for you but does extreme exercise increase risk and at what level? Too little physical activity is the problem for the majority of Americans, however in the last 10 years there have been increased reports of increased arterial plaque in experienced male endurance athletes.  Women are not typically studied...