Category: Intravenous Therapy

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Intravenous Therapy

Coronary heart disease is one of the leading causes of death among both men and women in the United States. Many cardiac patients are choosing to use chelation therapy for heart disease as a form of complementary medicine. But is it safe and effective? Claims of safety concerns caused by low calcium are no longer an issue because disodium EDTA was taken off the market. Disodium EDTA had to be infused slowly because of its effect on blood levels of calcium. We now use calcium EDTA which can be infused very quickly and is very safe. Let’s look at studies examining the effectiveness of chelation with EDTA. EDTA and Chelation Studies Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT): A clinical trial called the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) attempted to answer the question of safety and effectiveness. This clinical trial, an NIH-sponsored multicenter, double-blind safety and efficacy study, took place from 2002-2012 and was conducted in 134 sites across the United States and Canada. During TACT, 1,708 people, 50+ years old, with previous heart attacks were randomly assigned to receive 40 infusions of a chelation solution or a placebo (inactive) infusion. Research participants also received an oral vitamin and mineral...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Intravenous Therapy

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is the co-enzyme (Cousin) form of vitamin B3 (niacin). Most of the studies on oral NAD have been done on the precursor molecule nicotinamide riboside. When getting an infusion, it's pure NAD and there's an immediate energy boost. When taken orally the energy improvement is more subtle. The key function of NAD is generating ATP through oxidative phosphorylation also known as the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. ATP is the energy currency that drives cellular metabolism; without it we would die. NAD gets converted back and forth to another compound called NADH. NAD can also be referred to as NAD+. NAD and NADH are found in different concentrations within tissues of the body. The heart muscle contains 90 mcg NADH per gram, muscle brain tissue to 50 mcg/g and red blood cells contain 4mcg/g. Tissues that contain more NADH generate more energy. Drugs and other toxins disrupt this delicate system. NAD is used in addiction recovery centers. Long-term drug and alcohol use can decrease energy production in the mitochondria, intravenous NAD has been used at high doses to reboot cell machinery and reduce drug cravings. For this, patients start at 500 mg and go up...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Intravenous Therapy

Glutathione is an intracellular antioxidant and one of the most important ways our cells protect themselves from toxins in oxidative stress both in the environment and generated internally. The interest in taking it both orally and intravenously is not new. The lungs use it extensively to heal damage and protect against the inhalation of pollution, and it's needed for healthy response to lung infections. Human data for intravenous glutathione is limited however. The data that does exist is strong for organ protection during chemotherapy, skin lightening, and restoration of proper kidney function after imaging contrast toxicity. Interesting how much data there is on skin lightening and using glutathione IVs to make skin whiter seems ridiculous. There is also a reasonable data for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Instead of conducting studies regarding skin whitening they should do more human studies on Parkinson’s. Glutathione in a Meyer's Cocktail for Athletes There isn't data on wellness or exercise performance despite that glutathione appears to be effective for exercise recovery, recovery from lung infections, vital organ protection during toxic metal chelation especially with mercury, and possibly recovery from hangovers. Athletes, in particular, report benefits upon receiving glutathione in addition to a Meyer’s cocktail....