Category: Gastroenterological Health

  • Posted By:

    Denise ClarkDenise Clark

  • Category:

    Clinical Nutrition

Eosinphilic esophagitis (EoE) has historically been known as a rare allergic condition. However, it is becoming increasingly more common and can occur at any age, from infants to adults. It can manifest with mild symptoms such as occasional difficulty swallowing, throat pain, vomiting, and more serious incidents of food impaction in the esophagus. In this post we'll discuss the symptoms of EoE, how it's diagnosed, and the effectiveness of different treatment options including natural options. What is Eosinphilic Esophagitis? Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic allergy condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal reflux, nausea, stomach pain, and sometimes vomiting. It is diagnosed when an excessive amount of eosinophils are found in esophageal tissue. In recent years, EoE has emerged as a common cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract problems in both children and adults. What are Eosinophils? Eosinophils are white blood cells that are made in the bone marrow and circulate through blood vessels for 8-12 hours. After circulating, eosinophils migrate into a tissue, where they remain for 1-2 weeks. The Role of Eosinophils Eosinophil contain around 200 large granules of enzymes and proteins, which break open and release their toxic contents when the eosinophil is activated. Their function is to...

  • Posted By:

    Denise ClarkDenise Clark

  • Category:

    Gastroenterological Health

When it comes to matters of the gut, it can be tough to pinpoint your symptoms and understand what they might be telling you. Two conditions of the intestines that are similar in nature are Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), and Small Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth (SIBO). In this post we’ll highlight the differences between them so you can start to determine which one ails you, or, if it’s actually both. Identifying Irritable Bowel Syndrome IBS is a commonly known syndrome with the following typical symptoms: Abdominal bloating (swelling of the belly) Abdominal pain Diarrhea, constipation, or both It is often a diagnosis of exclusion when conventional gastro-intestinal testing does not find an underlying cause. IBS can be particularly painful. Gas trapped in the large intestine can create significant bloating and pain. Patients with these symptoms may also suffer with bowel urgency, straining or a sense of incomplete evacuation, and the passage of mucus in stools. Symptoms are often made worse by eating. Some patients also report lethargy, nausea, backache, and bladder symptoms. IBS Treatment IBS was first described in 1820 and was given the name Irritable Bowel Syndrome in 1944. Estimates are that 15-45% of the global population may be affected...