Category: Naturopathic Medicine

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Naturopathic Medicine

When it comes to cholesterol, it is helpful to know that “lipids” is the medical term for your HDL, LDL, VLDL, non HDL, and triglycerides. [1] Though simplistic, LDL is referred to as the bad cholesterol and HDL the good cholesterol. The reason for this is that cells have a receptor for LDL that allows the cholesterol particles to go in and HDL has receptor that pulls cholesterol away. This is called reverse cholesterol transport and it is important for arterial health. It is increasingly common to see humans with the metabolic syndrome of poor cholesterol numbers. It is mainly because of a lack of exercise coupled with too many carbohydrates. This is characterized by low HDL and high triglycerides and blood sugar is often mildly elevated. The metabolic syndrome is also referred to as prediabetes. This condition increases plaque buildup in the arteries among other things. In this post I share my advice on how to improve your cholesterol levels without medication.   How Diet and Exercise Affect Cholesterol A diet excessive in carbohydrates (starches and sugars) puts strain on your glucose regulation system. If you are not burning carbs then you are turning them into triglycerides and fat....

  • Posted By:

    Kelly Parcell

  • Category:

    Naturopathic Medicine

One of the new, cutting-edge treatments in the world of biohacking is the use of Rapamycin for longevity. Initially discovered as a byproduct produced by bacteria in the soil on Easter Island, Rapamycin was found to kill fungi. Eventually, its ability to inhibit the growth of all eukaryotic cells was also uncovered. It was found that Rapamycin targets a specific protein in cells that is responsible for metabolism and cell growth. This protein was then called mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). Rapamycin for Transplant Patients Subsequently, rapamycin is a prescription drug that has been used primarily for transplant patients as it suppresses the immune system and inhibits transplant rejection by blocking mTOR. White blood cells and other cells make mTOR, which causes the white blood cells to multiply and attack tissue. mTOR is an enzyme made by cells that helps cells grow, multiply, and spread. It is activated in response to nutrients, growth factors, energy, and stress. At certain times in our lives (during childhood, episodes of rapid growth and development) it is desirable to activate mTOR. mTOR is inappropriately activated in many conditions including auto-immune disease, cancer, and aging. Traditional side effects of Rapamycin in transplant patients include: Hypercholesterolemia...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Naturopathic Medicine

At NatureMed, we believe every patient should receive evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is not meant to be a cookbook, but rather a bottom-up decision system that integrates the best available scientific evidence with the doctor’s clinical experience according to the patient's circumstances and preferences. Patients in my practice receive evidence-based natural medicine. I am resistant to implementing treatments that do not have a reasonable amount of human data supporting them. Too often, conventional doctors use the term evidence-based medicine to describe what they have been taught to do. The assumption is that if there was good scientific evidence, they would have been taught about it. In other words, if they were not taught about it there is no evidence. Medicine has become more systematic and industrialized with prescribed standards of care which do not allow for lateral thinking. What is Evidence-based Medicine? According to the National Cancer Institute, the definition of evidence-based medicine is: “A systematic approach to medicine in which doctors and other health care professionals use the best available scientific evidence from clinical research to help make decisions about the care of individual patients. A physician’s clinical experience and the patient’s values and preferences are also important in...

  • Posted By:

    Kelly Parcell

  • Category:

    Naturopathic Medicine

The best part of human nature is the pursuit of improvement and curiosity. The invention of the world wide web in 1991 has not only enhanced but initiated this quality in humans. Just as patients have become disenchanted with the healthcare options offered by their primary care physician, doctors are also disenchanted with the limitations outlined by insurance companies and employers. This has led to a growing demand from both parties for alternative solutions. The first time in medical history that doctors attempted to seek alternative solutions to the conventional wisdom in medical practice dates back to early 19th century Europe. The nature cure movement was spawned by physicians in search of an alternative approach to healing which was truly health giving. This was a new approach as the medical practices at the time included purging, bleeding, and increased urination, often induced with such toxins as mercury and arsenic.  Today, some medical doctors are again seeking to move from a disease-centered model of practicing to a patient-centered model. They are seeking to utilize other forms of treatment for prevention, and not just relying on drugs and surgery. Although naturopathic medicine has been around for over 100 years, modernized terms such...

  • Posted By:

    Steve Parcell

  • Category:

    Chronic Fatigue

The Epstein-Barr virus causes a very common infection known as mononucleosis. Symptoms of mono include extreme fatigue, sore throat, fever, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tonsils, headache, rash, and sometimes a swollen spleen. However, some individuals develop a chronic reactivated Epstein-Barr (EBV) problem. [1],[2]  I have noticed this is common in people with chronic fatigue and have seen it quite a bit in competitive athletes. Detecting Reactivated Epstein-Barr In a study [3] on elite athletes with persistent fatigue, 27% were found to have chronic viral infections. Viral illness as a cause of long-term fatigue often goes undetected unless specific blood work is requested. In this study, eight of 37 athletes tested (22%) were actively secreting EBV into their saliva at the time of testing. The detection of EBV shedding suggests immune dysregulation and may contribute to the symptoms experienced by these athletes. EBV reactivation has recently been established in swimmers engaged in intensive training and is thought to result from exercise induced alterations in the immune mechanisms responsible for controlling viral reactivation. Evidence of infection was also found for cytomegalovirus (five cases), EBV (three cases), Ross River virus (one case), toxoplasmosis (one case), and mycoplasma (one case). Eight of the 37...