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  • Posted By:

    Steve ParcellSteve Parcell

Stephen W. Parcell, ND   Despite the fact that heart attack is the #1 cause of death for Americans many people still do not understand how to prevent having one or how to work with their doctors to identify coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis early in life before it becomes dangerous. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition of the artery wall. It affects the arteries of heart. We call this his coronary artery disease (CAD). ...
As I was preparing to blog on this topic I ran across this article which is well written and sums up my thoughts on the issue. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jen-landa-md/testosterone-therapy_b_4709168.html  ...
  • Posted By:

    Kelly ParcellKelly Parcell

  • Category:

    Integrative Cancer Support

By Kelly Parcell, ND and Steve Parcell, ND The Papanicolaou test (Pap smear) is one of the most effective cancer screening tests available.  It can detect premalignant lesions and has contributed to the decline in cervical cancer morbidity and mortality in the United States since its development in 1941. Pap smears in women who have smears categorized as low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL) or atypical squamous cells of undeterm...
Steve Parcell, ND Lipoproteins are a better measure of risk, and lipoprotein testing represents a new era in preventive cardiology. Just measuring LDL and treating it (while still somewhat effective) may not be enough for ultimate heart attack prevention, because it does not reflect lipoprotein size, density, or particle number. LDL and HDL are just not enough when it comes to evaluating your risk of a heart attack. This is particularly true if t...
  • Posted By:

    Kelly ParcellKelly Parcell

  • Category:

    Integrative Cancer Support

Kelly Parcell, ND So far, all studies examining the effects of hormone replacement therapy have shown no major reduction of cardiovascular risk. In fact, equine estrogens (Premarin) and progestins (Provera) appear to be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Naturally occurring estrogen does not fully account for why women get heart disease later than men either. According to a BMJ study in 1995 of postmenopausal women, there was no relat...